Course Descriptions & Course Outlines


Listed below are the course descriptions for the selected subject.
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Philosophy

PHIL 1101 -- Introduction to Philosophy,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 2 and 6)

Introduction to the nature and aims of philosophy, to some of its central problems and to the methods employed in philosophical discussion. Typical problems examined include the nature of reality, knowledge, values, and the self.


PHIL 1105 -- Introduction to Logic and Critical Reasoning,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 2 and 4)

This course is an introduction to a central part of Philosophy, the philosophical study of reasoning. Studies include the function and uses of language, the distinction between deductive and inductive arguments, methods for symbolizing and evaluating the validity of deductive arguments, and the detection of informal fallacies. Students will gain practical skills used in the evaluation of inductive and deductive arguments, which are applicable at all levels of reasoning.


PHIL 1110 -- Introduction to Ethics,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 6 and 9)

This class examines the leading attempts to answer the basic philosophical questions about the moral life. It will include an inquiry into views of the good life, personal character, and moral choices in the private and public domain. Further inquiry will explore the grounds for arguing that some moral judgments are correct and others incorrect.


PHIL 1115 -- Comparative World Religions,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 6 and 8)

Introduction to the central beliefs, history, sacred texts, and practices of living religions in the world today. The similarities and differences between religions, and within the religions, will be explored. The principle religions studied will be Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.


PHIL 1120 -- Environmental Ethics,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 9 and 10)

This course will explore moral obligations between humankind and our natural world. An introduction to ethical theory is included in the course. Topics will include such issues as the nature of our duties toward animal rights, preservation and conservation, climate change, and intergenerational justice.


PHIL 1189 -- Topics:,   Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
This course has been developed as a potential permanent course. The course must follow all the same policies and procedures related to curriculum outlined by the college. It does not duplicate existing course offerings. Refer to course notes for specific course description.


PHIL 1200 -- Medical Ethics,   3 credits Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
(Meets MnTC Goal 6 and 9)

This class will provide an introduction to classic and contemporary ethical theory, and it will then move on to apply ethical analysis in the field of health care and other related fields. Studies will include considerations around patients' rights (to privacy, information and autonomy), paternalism, personhood, the distribution of scarce resources, the right to treatment, and culturally relevant perspectives related to medical treatment. Applied topics may include euthanasia and physician assisted suicide, abortion, reproductive technologies, and genetic control. Students will evaluate contemporary case studies, using ethical theory developed in philosophy as well as the codes of ethics put forth by medical professional organizations.


PHIL 2299 -- Independent Study,   Search Current Course Schedule
Common Course Outline
Independent Study allows a student to earn credit while participating in a supervised learning experience in a community-based or work setting. Students must have successfully completed two courses in the discipline in which they want to undertake independent study. Forms are available in the Educational Services Office. All arrangements must be made prior to registration for the semester in which the project is scheduled and must be approved by the appropriate Dean of Educational Services. In addition, a project outline must be approved by the instructor who will supervise the student's work.


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