New Grading Options to Support Your Academic Success During COVID-19

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New Grading Options to Support Your Academic Success During COVID-19

The following guidance relates specifically to the courses you are currently enrolled in for the Spring 2020 academic term. These options do not apply to courses that ended prior to spring break. Before making a decision regarding any of these options, please consult with your academic advisor to discuss how a different grading option may impact your course completion rate, Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), and transfer. If you are a military student called for active duty, please contact your instructors and advisor prior to making any changes.

Updated May 20, 9:30 am

  • What Is It?

    Most classes at Anoka-Ramsey Community College are graded with a letter grade of A, B, C, D, or F. Normally, students receive this letter grade option when registering for a course, but it is also possible to register for a class on a Pass (P) or Fail (F) grading option. For the Spring 2020 term, the college is giving students the option to choose between letter grades or Pass (P)/No Credit (NC) grades, which means you can have until June 5, 2020 to choose your grade option.

    How Does It Work?

    Faculty in A-F graded courses assign grades on an A-F scale. Students who choose to have a P/NC grade denoted on their transcript will have letter grades A, B, and C converted to a “P” for “Pass” or a grade of D or F converted to a “NC” for No Credit. You can make the decision to convert your grade to a P/NC on a course-by-course basis. You have until June 5, 2020 to choose your grading option.

    How do I request this grading method change?

    Click here for Spring 2020 Grade Method Change form

    Potential Benefits

    1. With all of the time and effort you have invested in your courses already (as of April 6, we are already 2/3 of the way through the semester!), this grading option will provide a low-risk way for you to finish the course and continue to make progress toward your ultimate goal of graduation or transfer.

    2. P and NC grades are not included in the calculation of your grade point average (GPA). Thus, if challenging personal circumstances or the unexpected learning environment of remote learning make it harder this semester to get as high a grade as you would otherwise, this will protect your cumulative GPA.

    3. Because P and NC grades do not impact GPA, the P/NC grade method will offer students protection against being suspended as part of the Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) process. NC grades do reduce a student’s completion rate (the number of credits you earn vs. attempt).

    Potential Drawbacks

    1. Although a P/NC grade can’t hurt your GPA, it also can’t help your GPA. If students determine their GPA will increase by sticking with the A-F grading method, they should do so.

    2. Transfer institutions and graduate schools may not accept courses that were graded on a P/NC scale. Please meet with your advisor to determine how a P/NC grade would impact your transfer plan. Minnesota State is currently in conversation with our transfer partners to determine how a P/NC grade may be accepted. We will update you with more information as we receive it.

    3. PSEO students must consult their high school counselors or advisors to determine how a Pass/No Credit grade may impact their high school transcript.

    4. Some students may not be eligible for P/NC grading. These may include veterans on GI benefits, some international students, and students in some programs with external licensure.

    The good thing is – You don’t have to decide right now. You will have until June 5, 2020, to decide and submit if you wish to opt for P/NC grading. By this time, you will know how well you did in the course, and by then we will know more about what the implications are for transfer, graduate schools, veterans, Nursing students, etc.

  • What Is It?

    A temporary grade based on a written agreement between a student and faculty member. This grade may be assigned if a student is doing satisfactory work, has met a majority of course requirements, and is unable to complete the work of a course due to illness or other extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control. An “I” grade automatically becomes an “F” grade at the end of the next semester (not including the summer session) if requirements have not been satisfactorily met. The faculty member has the option of setting an earlier completion date.

    How Does It Work?

    Incomplete grades are to be initiated by the student by contacting the faculty member. If an agreement is reached, the instructor gives students an I grade at the end of the course, and then changes the grade to an A-F or P/NC grade when the work is later completed. There is a time limit for completing the work; if a student does not complete the work by the end of the fall semester or the agreed upon date between the college faculty and student, the I grade is automatically changed to an F on your transcript. Normally, College policy only allows faculty to give students an Incomplete in limited circumstances. The College is expanding options for faculty to use I grades in cases where a student cannot finish the necessary coursework by the end of the semester as a result of COVID-19.

    Potential Benefits

    1. Personal circumstances related to COVID-19 could prevent an individual student from completing their work. In semesters impacted by COVID-19, the federal government has expanded options for students to take a leave of absence while maintaining their financial aid. The use of Incomplete grades could give an individual more time to complete the course.

    Potential Drawbacks

    1. Our research shows that historically, the vast majority of students who receive Incompletes end up never completing the late work, and they end up getting an F.

      Therefore, for most students, the best option will be to continue the course through the end of the semester with a P/NC grade method instead of opting for an Incomplete.

    2. Incomplete grades temporarily impact a student’s completion rate, and students may be placed on academic warning or suspension until a final grade is entered
  • What Is It?

    The Minnesota State system typically sets a deadline for students to withdraw that is set at the point when 80 percent of the term has been completed. The system had extended that point to 90 percent of the term, which means Anoka-Ramsey Community College students in full-term courses will have until May 4 to decide whether to withdraw.

    How Does It Work?

    Students in full-term courses can withdraw (and get a grade of W) at any point between now and May 4. If you are in a shorter-term course, please contact your advisor to determine what the new withdraw deadline is.

    Potential Benefits

    1. Compared with the earlier withdrawal deadline, this will give students time to determine whether their new learning environment and personal circumstances provide an environment in which they can academically succeed in the current term.

    Potential Drawbacks

    1. A Withdrawal (W) grade will have the same impact on GPA, completion rate, and Satisfactory Academic Progress as does a No Credit (NC) grade.

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